Sync Training 101 for 2024

Sync Training 101 for 2024

Elevate Your Timing Knowledge – Empowering Network Engineers for Success in 2024

Technology evolution and new services provided through a network is the primary driver for modernization in the transport and wireless technologies. This is what triggers a set of new requirements needed to be met for the modern technologies to work, including Time and Synchronization. You will find below a few basic concepts and provide an overview of what is on the horizon for sync network modernization.

Imagine you are conducting a symphony orchestra where each musician represents a different signal or system. Frequency synchronization ensures all musicians are playing at the same tempo, so the music flows smoothly without anyone playing too fast or too slow. See Figure 1 below and you can assume that A and B are different musicians where the tempo makes the length of segments TA and TB the same. This type of synchronization is commonly found in TDM, SONET, Switches and legacy base stations. The most common strategies used over the years for frequency delivery are E1/T1 circuits, GPS/GNSS, Synchronous Ethernet, and PTP.

Sync Training 101 for 2024

Using the same analogy with the symphony orchestra, the Time synchronization is like making sure all musicians start playing at the exact same moment, following a shared beat. This ensures harmony and prevents any confusion or dissonance in the music. See Figure 2 below and note that each segment, both TA and TB are starting and ending each segment at the exact same time. This is most common found in Base Station, Network management or computer systems. The typical strategy for delivering this may be GPS with UTC traceability.

Sync Training 101 for 2024

Phase synchronization is akin to ensuring that all musicians are in sync with each other, playing their notes at the right moment within each beat. This coordination ensures that the music sounds cohesive and well-coordinated, without any instruments falling out of rhythm. See Figure 3 and note that the alignment in this case would be in Time and Phase. The most common scenarios where we are required to use this type of synchronization is for LTE Advance, CDMA, LET TDD, 5G and the most common strategy to deliver it is via PTP (IEEE 1588)

IEEE 1588 was developed initially for industrial applications, one of the motivations for this was to replace IRIG-B dedicated cooper connection when they had availability of a LAN network. This standard is also known as PTP or Precision Time Protocol. Within the same protocol we work with different industries that may work with different profiles, power industries, video, Telecom. In the last one, we have Telecom 2008, which was the first profile, follow by G.8265.1 that are layer 3 unicast and used for frequency reconstruction. Then we have G8275.1 and G.8275.2 which can be used for frequency reconstruction but are mainly used for time/phase transfer profiles.

Where are headed?

As technology evolves and new services are provided through the network, we also need to make changes to the transport and wireless technologies. We come from a TDM/SONET network that still has some services that will need to stay in place for the near future. Therefore, we need to make sure that this is considered when modernizing the Synchronization Network.

One of the challenges that we have from legacy architectures is that GPS is the most common source of timing as it was typically found remarkably close at the end applications. So, as the network grows and evolves, we are facing high costs in maintenance and management, but even more important, we start seeing how the vulnerabilities also grow. Networks depending on GPS everywhere without a backup source of timing or firewall systems are exposed to factors like jamming or spoofing that can impact severely the services at all levels, and sometimes without nobody noticing.

The world changes, and so does the technology that supports it, so for every step forward that we take, we must take the time to plan, evaluate the current solution, leverage what we have or can, but also adjust what we need in order to fit successfully into the high-speed world that we are today delivering the best class services.

SyncTraining 101 for 2024

IEEE 1588 was developed initially for industrial applications, one of the motivations for this was to replace IRIG-B dedicated cooper connection when they had availability of a LAN network. This standard is also known as PTP or Precision Time Protocol. Within the same protocol we work with different industries that may work with different profiles, power industries, video, Telecom. In the last one, we have Telecom 2008, which was the first profile, follow by G.8265.1 that are layer 3 unicast and used for frequency reconstruction. Then we have G8275.1 and G.8275.2 which can be used for frequency reconstruction but are mainly used for time/phase transfer profiles.

Where are Headed?

As technology evolves and new services are provided through the network, we also need to make changes to the transport and wireless technologies. We come from a TDM/SONET network that still has some services that will need to stay in place for the near future. Therefore, we need to make sure that this is considered when modernizing the Synchronization Network.

One of the challenges that we have from legacy architectures is that GPS is the most common source of timing as it was typically found remarkably close at the end applications. So, as the network grows and evolves, we are facing high costs in maintenance and management, but even more important, we start seeing how the vulnerabilities also grow. Networks depending on GPS everywhere without a backup source of timing or firewall systems are exposed to factors like jamming or spoofing that can impact severely the services at all levels, and sometimes without nobody noticing.

The world changes, and so does the technology that supports it, so for every step forward that we take, we must take the time to plan, evaluate the current solution, leverage what we have or can, but also adjust what we need in order to fit successfully into the high-speed world that we are today delivering the best class services.

Sophia Quintero

Sophia Quintero

Sales Engineer

With over eight years of work experience in the telecommunications industry, I’m a sales engineer who is passionate about providing innovative and tailored solutions to meet the needs of diverse clients. I have a strong background in network engineering and design that also allow me to take any business challenges and transform them into opportunities for growth.

GPS/GNSS White Papers

GPS/GNSS White Papers

Curated Collection of Microchip GPS/GNSS White Papers & Reports


GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) technology includes GPS (Global Positioning System, United States owned and operated) along with Global Satellite Navigation Systems operated by China (Beidu) and Russia (Glonass). Beyond providing location and positioning information, GNSS is used to deliver accurate timing that is distributed in communications networks for a variety of applications. An interruption or degradation of these timing signals can impact mission critical applications and services.

 

Background White Paper GNSS/GPS Information 

In the intricate realm of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and their ubiquitous counterpart, the Global Positioning System (GPS), the importance of white papers stands as a beacon guiding engineers through the complexities. These white papers are not mere documents; they are gateways to understanding the engineering intricacies that underpin modern navigation technologies. This post delves into the world of GNSS/GPS white papers, unraveling the engineering marvels that shape our global positioning landscape.

The Foundation of GNSS/GPS White Papers

At their core, GNSS/GPS white papers serve as authoritative documents, encapsulating a wealth of knowledge, research findings, and engineering insights. These papers emanate from the collaborative efforts of engineers, researchers, and experts who navigate the intricate landscape of satellite-based navigation systems. The foundation of these papers lies in the need to disseminate cutting-edge engineering knowledge, making them indispensable resources for professionals in the field.

Understanding GNSS/GPS Fundamentals

A well-crafted GNSS/GPS white paper is an invaluable resource for engineers seeking a profound understanding of the fundamentals. It dives deep into the intricacies of satellite orbits, signal processing, and the synchronization mechanisms that orchestrate the harmonious dance of satellites in the Earth’s exosphere. Engineers exploring these papers embark on a journey through the technological intricacies that empower our smartphones, navigation devices, and countless other applications.

Signal Processing: The Heartbeat of GNSS

One of the engineering-centric aspects explored in GNSS/GPS white papers is signal processing — the heartbeat of satellite navigation. Engineers dissect the algorithms and methodologies employed to extract accurate position, velocity, and timing information from the signals transmitted by satellites. Understanding signal processing intricacies is crucial for enhancing the accuracy and reliability of GNSS systems, especially in challenging environments where signal integrity faces potential disruptions.

Overcoming Challenges: Multipath, Interference, and Accuracy

White papers in the GNSS/GPS domain unravel the challenges faced by engineers in achieving pinpoint accuracy. Multipath interference, a phenomenon where signals reflect off surfaces before reaching the receiver, poses a significant hurdle. These papers explore innovative techniques and advanced algorithms engineered to mitigate multipath effects and enhance overall system accuracy. Additionally, they delve into strategies to counteract interference from various sources, ensuring robust and uninterrupted navigation.

Innovation and Evolving Technologies

The engineering landscape is dynamic, and GNSS/GPS white papers serve as compasses guiding engineers through the ever-evolving terrain of innovation. They shed light on emerging technologies such as Real-Time Kinematic (RTK) positioning, Precise Point Positioning (PPP), and integration with other sensor technologies. Engineers immerse themselves in these papers to stay abreast of advancements that shape the future of satellite-based navigation.

Security in the Satellite Constellation

The security of GNSS/GPS systems is a paramount concern, and white papers play a pivotal role in addressing this aspect. Engineers explore cryptographic techniques, anti-jamming measures, and resilient architectures designed to safeguard satellite constellations from malicious attacks. The engineering insights provided in these papers contribute to the ongoing efforts to fortify GNSS/GPS systems against potential threats.

Real-World Applications and Case Studies

GNSS/GPS white papers bridge the gap between theory and real-world applications. Engineers are exposed to case studies detailing the implementation of satellite navigation in diverse fields — from autonomous vehicles and precision agriculture to disaster response and infrastructure development. These case studies offer invaluable engineering lessons drawn from practical experiences, enriching the knowledge base of professionals.

In conclusion, GNSS/GPS white papers are compasses guiding engineers through the intricate engineering landscapes of satellite navigation. They unravel the complexities of signal processing, address challenges, explore innovations, enhance security, and bridge the gap between theory and application. Engineers who delve into these white papers embark on a journey of continuous learning, contributing to the evolution of GNSS/GPS technologies that shape our connected world. As we navigate the future, the insights gleaned from these engineering-centric documents will continue to steer the course of innovation and excellence in satellite-based navigation systems.

Symmetricom

Symmetricom

Symmetricom SSU 2000 Remains a Timing Mainstay

A Chronology of Symmetricom Precision Timekeeping

In the realm of precision timekeeping and synchronization, Symmetricom has left an indelible mark on the landscape of technological innovation. The company, founded in 1985, emerged as a pioneer in providing solutions that ensured precise timing for critical applications such as telecommunications, aerospace, and defense. As we delve into the rich history of Symmetricom, it becomes evident that its journey is not just a narrative of corporate milestones but a testament to the pivotal role it played in shaping the infrastructure of time-sensitive industries.

Symmetricom’s inception was marked by a commitment to excellence in precision timekeeping. The company quickly became synonymous with cutting-edge technologies designed to address the intricate demands of modern communication systems. Its products were instrumental in synchronizing networks, facilitating seamless data transmission, and ensuring that every fraction of a second was accounted for. Symmetricom’s innovative solutions were not confined to a single sector; instead, they became integral components of various industries where timing precision was paramount.

 

Enter the SSU 2000 – It Hasn’t Left Yet

One of Symmetricom’s notable contributions to the world of precision timekeeping was the Symmetricom SyncServer Unit 2000 (SSU 2000). Introduced in [year], the SSU 2000 represented a leap forward in accuracy and reliability. This advanced timing solution was tailored to meet the stringent requirements of telecommunications networks, where synchronization is critical for seamless communication. The SSU 2000 offered state-of-the-art features, including multiple timing inputs, high-stability oscillators, and redundant power supplies, ensuring a robust and fail-safe timing infrastructure for telecommunications operators.

The SSU 2000’s significance in the telecommunications landscape cannot be overstated. With the proliferation of digital communication networks, the demand for precise and synchronized timing became more pronounced. The SSU 2000 addressed these challenges by providing a scalable and adaptable solution that could seamlessly integrate into existing network architectures. Its deployment marked a turning point for telecommunications operators, who now had access to a reliable and technologically advanced timing source.

In addition to its technical prowess, the SSU 2000 reflected Symmetricom’s commitment to quality and innovation. The product underwent rigorous testing and certifications, adhering to industry standards and surpassing expectations. Symmetricom’s emphasis on research and development ensured that the SSU 2000 remained at the forefront of timing technology, adapting to evolving industry needs. As a result, the SSU 2000 became a trusted choice for telecommunications providers seeking a resilient and precise timing solution.

The legacy of Symmetricom and its groundbreaking products, such as the SSU 2000, extends beyond the technological realm. It symbolizes a chapter in the evolution of precision timekeeping, where innovation and reliability converged to redefine the standards of synchronization. As we reflect on Symmetricom’s journey, it is evident that the company’s dedication to precision and excellence has left an enduring impact on the fabric of modern communication networks. The SSU 2000, with its technological sophistication and reliability, stands as a testament to Symmetricom’s commitment to shaping the future of precision timing.

Curent SSU 2000 Part Numbers Available

Please call for pricing and lead times.

23413016-001-0 Microchip New SSU 2000 MAC STRATUM 2E RB CLOCK

23413015-000-0 Microchip New SSU 2000 Stratum 3E Qz Clock

23413012-002-0 Microchip New SSU 2000 RADIUS Capable & SSH COMMS Card with SNMPv2/v3

23413013-002-0 Microchip New SSU 2000 DS1 Input (multi-port)

23413014-002-0 Microchip New SSU 2000 E1 Input (multi-port)

23413019-000-0 Microchip New SSU 2000 GPS Input

R23413279-000-0 Microchip Refurbished SSU 2000 Composite Clock Input

R23413017-000-0 Microchip New $2,431 SSU 2000 20 Output DS1

23413158-000-0 Microchip New SSU 2000 Composite Clock 20 Output

R23413292-000-0 Microchip Refurbished SSU 2000 E1/2048 Output Module (20 Outputs)

As time progresses and technology undergoes continuous advancements, the need for reliable replacement parts for legacy systems like the SSU 2000 becomes crucial. Symmetricom recognized the importance of supporting its installed base, ensuring that customers could maintain and extend the life of their timing infrastructure. The availability of replacement parts, timing cards, and chassis for Symmetricom systems became a testament to the company’s commitment to customer satisfaction and long-term support.

For users of Symmetricom timing systems, including the SSU 2000, the company established a comprehensive support ecosystem. Replacement parts, ranging from high-stability oscillators to specialized timing cards, were meticulously designed and manufactured to meet the original specifications of Symmetricom’s products. This commitment to compatibility ensured that customers could seamlessly integrate new components into their existing timing systems, preserving the performance and reliability they had come to expect.

Symmetricom

The Symmetricom replacement parts catalog extended beyond individual components, encompassing complete timing cards and chassis for various timing systems. This approach allowed customers to address specific needs, whether it involved upgrading a particular component for enhanced performance or replacing an entire chassis to accommodate evolving network requirements. Symmetricom’s dedication to providing a wide array of replacement options reflected its understanding of the diverse and evolving needs of its user base.

In addition to the SSU 2000, other Symmetricom timing systems benefited from a robust ecosystem of replacement parts. Timing cards, featuring advanced technologies and precision components, were designed to integrate seamlessly into existing systems, ensuring minimal downtime during upgrades or maintenance. The modular nature of Symmetricom’s timing systems allowed users to tailor their replacements to align with the specific requirements of their network infrastructure.

Symmetricom’s commitment to supporting legacy systems was not solely about providing replacement parts. The company recognized the importance of comprehensive service and support to guide customers through the process of upgrading or maintaining their timing infrastructure. Technical assistance, documentation, and training resources were readily available, empowering users to make informed decisions and maximize the longevity of their Symmetricom timing systems.

In conclusion, the availability of replacement parts, timing cards, and chassis for Symmetricom timing systems, including the SSU 2000, exemplified the company’s dedication to customer satisfaction and long-term support. As technological landscapes evolved, Symmetricom ensured that its customers could adapt and thrive by offering a comprehensive suite of replacement options. This commitment not only preserved the operational integrity of existing systems but also reinforced Symmetricom’s legacy as a trusted provider of precision timing solutions.

logos of retired timing equipment

About Us Syncworks

For over twenty years, Syncworks has been evaluating, testing, designing, and implementing timing networks for telecom, cable, utility, and enterprise customers in the US and the Caribbean. We are a well-known and trusted partner and critical supplier to major network operators.  As a diamond partner to Microchip and a skilled integrator of other vendor products, we can provide options for the most performant, resilient, and economical timing network possible. We specialize in ensuring that critical networks can survive disruptions like GPS jamming and spoofing. And we provide expert support, sparing, and repairs for everything we install leveraging the largest inventory of related products and components in the industry. 

Syncworks is a value-added stocking reseller of network sync and timing equipment for critical infrastructure companies. SyncCare and Field Services ensure your network equipment is flawlessly executed and supported.  

Our 10,000 sq. ft. warehouse stocks and ships critical equipment and replacements for networks all across the USA and the Caribbean. With expertise from GPS signal to our new output expansion panels, we an experience and trusted guide. Our tight-knit crew of engineers and field services technicians work together to efficiently and effectively bring your network to Stratum 1 standards.

Syncworks delivers the highest level of expertise to every project and offers a complete menu of network synchronization products and services. Our flagship product, the TimeProvider® 4100, is a gateway clock that accepts multiple inputs from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), Synchronous Ethernet (SynE), and 1588 PTP Grandmaster Clock and E1/T1 digital transmission links.  

As a Microchip Diamond Partner, we maintain the largest and most diversified stocking supply of Microchip network sync & timing products to meet our customers’ every need when it comes to sync and timing technology.  

For more information, contact sales@syncworks.com or call (904) 280-1234

What is a BITS Clock?

What is a BITS Clock?

Unlocking the Power of BITS Clocks for Seamless Synchronization

In the world of modern communication and data networks, Building Integrated Timing Supply (BITS) plays a crucial role. BITS is essentially a synchronized Time Division Multiplexing (TDM) signal that acts as the beating heart of various systems. It ensures the seamless operation of communication networks and data transmission, offering unparalleled reliability and stability. However, BITS is not a one-size-fits-all solution; it excels in certain areas while having limitations in others.

BITS – The Reliable Foundation

BITS clock is a synchronous TDM signal that provides a highly reliable and stable source for propagating frequency across extensive transmission networks. It serves as the backbone for various legacy TDM networks, including SONET/SDH. Moreover, BITS clock finds its utility in local business telephone exchanges, VoIP systems, and TDM PBXs. It even extends its support to 2G and 3G mobile communication networks and aviation traffic control systems.

BITS clock

Limitations

While BITS clock is a powerful tool for synchronization, it does come with some limitations. It does not support phase or Time of Day (ToD) synchronization. This means that it excels in providing precise timing but might not be suitable for applications that require phase accuracy or time-specific synchronization.

The Unidirectional Path
BITS clock links are inherently unidirectional. They transmit the clock signal from a Master clock or Office clock to the relevant Network Elements. These Network Elements can either recover the clock directly from the line when terminating a service or continue transmitting it to Network Elements further down the chain.

In conclusion, BITS clocks are the unsung heroes of communication systems, offering a reliable and stable timing source for various applications. However, it’s important to keep in mind their limitations when considering them for synchronization needs. Their unidirectional nature ensures that the heartbeat of your network keeps ticking, making them an indispensable component in the world of modern communication.

About Syncworks

Syncworks is a the national leader in GPS security. Critical infrastructure in the US is a top priority at the highest level of government. Our mission is to enable, educate, and support efforts to become complaint with celestial and terrestrial GPS systems working together.
  
Our flagship product, the TimeProvider® 4100, is a gateway clock that accepts multiple inputs from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), Synchronous Ethernet (SynE), and IEEE 1588 PTP Grandmaster Clock and E1/T1 digital transmission links.  

As of January 1, 2024, we have expanded our Field Services to include Antenna Installation and Entrance Facility Cabling, Legacy Equipment Decom and Traffic Migration, Disposal (hazmat) Services, Radio Commissioning (MW, P-LTE, CBRS), Enterprise Wi-Fi.

For more information, contact sales@syncworks.com or call (904) 280-1234